Le case farmaceutiche israeliane testano farmaci sui prigionieri palestinesi.

La professoressa israeliana Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian ha rivelato ieri che le autorità di occupazione israeliane rilasciano permessi a grandi aziende farmaceutiche per effettuare test su prigionieri palestinesi e arabi, ha riferito Felesteen.ps.

continua Le case farmaceutiche israeliane testano farmaci sui prigionieri palestinesi. — Notizie dal Mondo

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No reward for Palestinian who hacked Zuckerberg Facebook page

SAN FRANCISCO (AFP) — A researcher who hacked into Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg’s profile to expose a security flaw won’t get the customary reward payment from the social network.

While Facebook offers rewards for those who find security holes, it seems that Palestinian researcher Khalil Shreateh went too far by posting the information on Zuckerberg’s own profile page.

Shreateh said on his blog he found a way for Facebook users to circumvent security and modify a user’s timeline.

He said he took the unusual step of hacking into Zuckerberg’s profile after being ignored by the Facebook security team.

“So i did post to Mark Zuckerberg’s timeline , as those pictures shows,” he said, including screen shots of the posting.

“Dear Mark Zuckerberg,” he wrote.”First sorry for breaking your privacy and post to your wall, i had no other choice to make after all the reports i sent to Facebook team. My name is KHALIL from Palestine.”

His reward for exposing the flaw was having his Facebook account disabled.

He later got a message saying, “We are unfortunately not able to pay you for this vulnerability because your actions violated our Terms of Service. We do hope, however, that you continue to work with us to find vulnerabilities in the site.”

Facebook said it appreciates help with security but not by hacking into user accounts.

“I am just an unemployed young Palestinian man who has applied for several jobs…but couldn’t find an opportunity…our bad economic conditions and other things needless to mention,” Shreateh told Ma’an.

“I dreamed of building a career after I found a flaw in Facebook…but I seem to be unlucky. If I do tests on a million accounts to prove my discovery, you will ignore my emails…but why when it came to Mark’s page you admitted there was a flaw, and you closed my account?” he added.

Facebook security engineer Matt Jones posted a comment Sunday on a security forum saying “we fixed this bug on Thursday,” and admitted that “we should have asked for additional … instructions after his initial report.”

“We get hundreds of reports every day,” Jones said. “We have paid out over $1 million to hundreds of reporters. However, many of the reports we get are nonsense or misguided.”

Jones added that “the more important issue here is with how the bug was demonstrated using the accounts of real people without their permission.”

“We welcome and will pay out for future reports from him (and anyone else!) if they’re found and demonstrated within these guidelines,” Jones said on the YCombinator hacker news forum.

Independent security researcher Graham Cluley said he had “some sympathy” with Facebook on the issue.

“Although he was frustrated by the response from Facebook’s security team, Shreateh did the wrong thing by using the flaw to post a message on Mark Zuckerberg’s wall,” Cluley said on his blog.

thanks to:

Palestinian kid with dual US citizenship shot in neck with live bullet | Defence for Children International Palestine

Ramallah, 25 July 2013­—Defence for Children International Palestine is disturbed by the shooting of a Palestinian child with dual American citizenship by an Israeli soldier in the West Bank town of Silwad on Wednesday.

Around 7 pm, an Israeli soldier fired live bullets at a small group of boys walking home near the main road in the western part of town, according to DCI-Palestine sources. Two bullets struck Jihad Hamad, 14, in the neck and right shoulder. One of the bullets also caused damage to his vocal chords. He was first rushed to an emergency clinic in Silwad, and later transferred to the Ramallah Medical Complex for treatment. His condition was described as stable.

Hamad’s father told DCI-Palestine that his son holds American citizenship.

“It is clear from incidents like this that some Israeli soldiers plainly view Palestinian kids as targets,” said Ayed Abu Eqtaish, Accountability Program director. “Israeli soldiers are rarely held accountable for acts like this and the resulting impunity simply leads to increasing violence against Palestinian civilians, including children.”

According to eyewitness reports, the situation was calm and the Israeli soldiers in the area were not in any danger that would allow the use of live ammunition.

The Israeli army’s open-fire regulations allow soldiers to use live ammunition “only under circumstances of real mortal danger,” according to a recent report by B’Tselem, an Israeli human rights group.

Israeli forces are prohibited from firing rubber-coated metal bullets at women and children. Where firing rubber-coated metal bullets is allowed, police and military procedures state that they must only be fired from a distance of 50-60 meters (165 – 195 feet) and at the legs of people.

Despite these regulations, at least 21 children have been shot and injured by live ammunition, rubber-coated metal bullets or tear-gas canisters since January 2013, including two fatalities, according to evidence collected by DCI-Palestine.

In May, Atta Sabbah, 12, from Jalazoun refugee camp near Ramallah was shot by an Israeli soldier while trying to retrieve his school bag from another soldier nearby. The live bullet struck Atta in the stomach and exited through his back, severing his spinal cord and causing paralysis from the waist down. It also caused damage to his liver, lungs, pancreas and spleen.

DCI-Palestine documentation shows 32 percent of children were shot in the face or head, 18 percent in the arm or chest, and 14 percent in the stomach. One child was shot multiple times with live ammunition.

The majority of these children’s families have not filed any complaints to the Israeli authorities regarding injuries incurred through use of lethal or non-lethal weapons, as they do not believe there will be any criminal case brought against soldiers.

Since 2000, Yesh Din reports only five percent of complaints submitted to the Military Police Criminal Investigations Division lead to an indictment. Moreover, victims of soldier crime are reluctant to speak out “for fear they may come to harm, either for the soldiers who discover they filed a complaint or by the denial of various permits.”

viaPalestinian kid with dual US citizenship shot in neck with live bullet | Defence for Children International Palestine.

Strange disease eating away body of prisoner Ayham Kamamji

Strange disease eating away body of prisoner Ayham Kamamji.

JENIN, (PIC)– Islamic Jihad detainees in an Israeli jail said their prison mate Ayham Kamamji, 27, suffers from an unknown serious disease gradually disintegrating the tissue of his body.

In a leaked letter from Ramon jail, the detainees explained that this strange disease caused a 20-centimeter cavity in Kamamji’s back and his body started to decompose.

They said that the Israeli prison administration has been neglecting his health condition for six months and has not allowed him to undergo medical tests.

The detainees appealed to human rights groups to intervene to urgently provide him with appropriate medical treatment.

The detainees also called for taking action to end the medical neglect policy pursued by the Israeli jailers against the Palestinian prisoners and to pressure the Israeli prison authority to respect the medical needs of patients in its jails.

“The Police Shot Me, Then Cuffed Me”, Says Victim Of Bank Attack

Friday May 31, 2013

A young Palestinian man, from the Negev, who was shot and seriously injured by Israeli Police fire when an armed Israeli man attacked the Hapoalim Bank in Beersheba, on Monday May 20, stated that the Israeli Police shot and cuffed him, after instantly profiling him as the assailant.

Omar Waleeedy – aljabha.org

The Israeli man killed four persons, and then killed himself, after the bank refused to give him a 6000 NIS loan. The Arab man, Omar Al-Waleedy, 22, was shot by four live rounds leading to serious injuries.

Israeli Ynetnews has reported that Al-Waleedy, remained on life support for ten days, and when he told his story, the Police said that “his version was inconsistent with the outcome of the investigation”.

He said that he hid under a table, fearing for his life when he saw the gunman, but when the Police stormed the bank, they shot and wounded him.
In his testimony, Al-Waleedy said; “I though the Police arrived to save me from the killer who killed four, but they shot me”.

From his hospital bed in Soroka Israeli hospital in Beersheba (Be’er As-Sabe’), Al-Waleedy said; “I arrived at the bank with my Jewish friend, Iran Sabri, in order to open an account for him, all of a sudden, a white-bearded man stormed into the Bank and opened fire in different directions”.

“I laid onto the ground, pretending to be dead; the attacker took a female employee hostage, and went to the toilets, then my friend and I rushed to the main door of the Bank”, he said, “The Police allowed my friend to pass, but they shot me, then they handcuffed me before evacuating the bank building”.

Following the incident, the Police claimed that eyewitness testimonies indicate that the Police “did not open fire at Al-Waleedy during the attack”.

On Thursday at night, May 31, the family of Al-Waleedy forced Police investigators out of his hospital room, and refused to allow them to interrogate him.

They asked the police to allow him to rest, and recover; the Police then arrested four.

One of the relatives said that the Police “was adding insult to injury” by trying to question Al-Waleedy on his hospital bed, “injustice took place the moment they shot him and took him to hospital in handcuffs”, he said.

According to Ynet, the police said that the fact the Al-Waleedy was unconscious made it impossible for the investigators to question him.

The Police also stated that crime scene investigation led to the conclusion that the Police “did not open fire at Al-Waleedy at any time during the attack”, the Ynet said, and added that a source at the Soroka Medical center indicated that “it is possible that Al-Waleedy was shot by the same gun that killed the four victims.”

thanks to: Saed Bannoura

Mother appeals for surgery for imprisoned son

Published Thursday 30/05/2013 (updated) 31/05/2013

GAZA CITY (Ma’an) — The mother of a prisoner from the Gaza Strip detained in Israel has appealed for emergency surgery for her son.

Murad Abu Moleq’s mother and father were able to visit their son in April.

“When I saw him he was terribly ill and needed an urgent surgery but Israeli prison administration refuses and postpones his surgery,” his mother told Ma’an.

She said he had already had one surgery to remove part of his intestine, but suffered serious infections after the operation and his condition worsened. She added that he had no health problems before his detention.

Murad’s brother Ziyad told Ma’an the family received information Murad was in a coma in a hospital in Beersheva.

Ziyad said Israel’s prison administration refused to update Murad’s lawyer on his condition, and whether he was expected to survive.

“My brother was shot in the leg and was detained while bleeding in June 2001. He was committing an attack against Israel and was caught and shot,” Ziyad said.

Murad was sentenced to 22 years.

thanks to:

Israel effectively barring tourists from West Bank by neglecting to explain mandatory permit

To visit Palestinian-controlled areas, some foreign nationals need military entry permit that Israel doesn’t explain how to get.

19.05.13 Since the beginning of 2013, Israel has forbidden tourists from the United States and other countries to enter the territories under Palestinian Authority control without a military entry permit – but it has not explained the application process to them.

Haaretz has learned of a recent case where clerics from the United States had to sign a declaration at the Ben-Gurion International Airport, promising not to enter Area A without permits from the Coordinator of Activities in the Territories.

The clerics signed the declaration, but representatives of the Population, Immigration and Borders Authority did not explain to them how to get the permits.

Not every tourist who is planning to visit the West Bank is required to sign the declaration, and no criteria have been published for how people are selected to do so.

The American clerics, who spoke with Haaretz on condition of anonymity, were sent by their church to work with Christian communities in East Jerusalem and the West Bank. As a result of the declaration they signed and their inability to decipher the procedure for obtaining the permit, they have been unable to meet with the members of Christian communities in West Bank cities or visit holy places, like the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem.

One of the signers, who turned to the United States Consulate in Jerusalem for help, told Haaretz that the consulate employees are unaware of the existence of the declaration.

The text of the English-language version of the document reads:

“1. I understand that this permit is granted me for entry and visitation within Israel only, and it has been explained to me that I am unable to enter the areas under the control of the Palestinian Authority without advance authorization from the Territory Actions Coordinator and I agree to act in accordance with these regulations.

“2. I understand that in the event that I enter any area under the control of the Palestinian Authority without the appropriate authorization all relevant legal actions will be taken against me, including deportation and denial of entry into Israel for a period of up to ten years.”

In the Hebrew version, there is also a clear statement that unauthorized entry to the areas under the control of the Palestinian Authority is a transgression of the law. This is omitted from the English version.

The English version does not use the official and common English title “Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories,” but translates the Hebrew as “Territory Actions Coordinator,” raising doubts as to whether the coordinator’s office has seen the form.

The spokeswoman for the Population, Immigration and Borders Authority, Sabine Haddad, wrote to Haaretz that the Entry into Israel Law authorizes the interior minister to decide on the entry of foreigners to the State of Israel, but in the case of Judea and Samaria, the Israel Defense Forces chief of general staff makes the determination – with a permit from the coordinator’s office required by security legislation.

“When a tourist/foreign national arrives at the international border crossings and it is believed that he wants to enter Judea and Samaria, he should be informed [of the procedure] and asked for his promise to receive a permit from the coordinator’s office before his entry – a permit that constitutes an essential condition [of entry to the Palestinian Authority controlled areas],” said Haddad.

Haddad did not reply to Haaretz’s request for explanation of the pertinent clauses of the law, nor did she provide Haaretz with information about the department in the coordinator’s office from which to request the permit. On the English website of the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories – a military unit that carries out and implements civilian policy in the territories – including the part dealing with ties with international organizations, there is no mention of the existence of such a procedure. In reply to an inquiry by Haaretz, the spokesman for the coordinator’s office said the matter of the procedure and the form is being examined.

About seven years ago, there was a report of a similar declaration that tourists were required to sign, but the practice was discontinued and renewed only at the beginning of this year. Several years ago, the Interior Ministry also began to limit the freedom of movement of tourists with work and family ties in the West Bank and to prevent their entry into Israel by means of a permit with the stamp “For the territories of Judea and Samaria only.”

Attorney Adi Lustigman turned Haaretz’s attention to a legal decision from August 2010 by Jerusalem District Court Judge Moshe Yoed Hacohen, which dealt with the appeal she filed against preventing the entry into Israel of an American citizen. Hacohen ruled that even according to the Oslo Accords, which the Interior Ministry occasionally relies on to explain restrictions on the movement of tourists, citizens of countries that have diplomatic ties with Israel need only an entry permit for Israel and a valid passport to enter Palestinian Authority territories. They are not required to have visiting permits from the Palestinian Authority, which are granted with the approval of the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (as is required of citizens of countries that do not have diplomatic ties with Israel, and citizens from Arab countries such as Egypt and Jordan).

Lustigman believes the policy behind the declaration is illegal because it discriminates between foreign citizens whose destination is the settlements and those whose destination is Palestinian areas. The form itself, Lustigman says, “is not legal because it was formulated for an improper purpose – isolating the occupied territories – and in an improper manner. It makes the assumption that people who arrive in Israel as tourists, as clerics and for other purposes want to act in contradiction to the law, which may not even have been explained to them clearly.

“There is no reason to threaten foreign citizens, to turn them into suspects and to make them sign, as a condition for entering Israel, a form whose wording and content are unclear … If there really is such a procedure, it should be publicized in a simple, clear and accessible manner, and instead of handing out a threatening sheet of paper, they should hand out a paper containing an explanation and procedures for making the request. Because the Interior Ministry does not do so, and as far as I know neither does the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories, it seems that there is no operative procedure, nor any procedure for submitting a request. We are left only with a prohibition, which, as we have mentioned, is invalid.”

The spokesperson for the U.S. Consulate did not answer Haaretz’s question as to whether Israel has informed the American authorities about the restriction and the obligation to sign, and did not explain the viewpoint of the U.S. Department of State on the issue.

thanks to: Amira Hass

Salam Fayyad, the World Bank and the Oslo game

Most Palestinian analysts maintain that the Oslo agreements are to blame for the collapse of the Palestinian economy.

Triggered by gas-price increases, tens of thousands of Palestinian taxi, truck and bus drivers in the West Bank observed a one-day strike, effectively shutting down cities. This, as Al Jazeera reported, was the culmination of several days of protests where thousands of Palestinians, frustrated by the economic crisis in the West Bank, took to the streets. After these protesters forced the closure of government offices, Prime Minister Salam Fayyad decided to decrease fuel prices and cut the salaries of top Palestinian Authority officials in an effort to appease his angry constituents.

Prime Minister Fayyad, a former IMF executive, undoubtedly knows that both his previous decision to increase gas prices as well as his recent decision to decrease them will have no real effect on the looming economic crisis. Report after report has documented the Palestinian economy’s complete dependence on foreign aid, while underscoring the severe poverty and chronic food insecurity plaguing the population. These reports all suggest that Israel’s occupation is to blame for the unfolding economic debacle, raising the crucial question of why the Palestinians” wrath was directed at Fayyad rather than at Israel.

The clue to this enigma can be found in the missing chapter of a World Bank report published barely a week after the protests subsided. Warning that the fiscal crisis in the West Bank and Gaza Strip is deepening, the World Bank blamed the Israeli government for maintaining a tight grip over 60 per cent of the West Bank, denying Palestinians access to the majority of arable land in the area as well as limiting their access to water and other natural resources.

Remarkably, the economists who wrote the report highlight the impact of severe Israeli restrictions to Palestinian land but say nothing about economic policy. They seem to suggest that if only the Oslo process had been allowed to go forward, then the Palestinian economy would not be so badly off. Therefore they fail to mention the detrimental effect of the Paris Protocols, the Palestinian-Israeli Interim Agreement of April 1994 that spells out Oslo’s economic arrangements.

Interestingly, the three foundational documents that Fayyad has published since he began his tenure as Prime Minister – Palestinian Reform and Development Plan from 2008; Ending the Occupation and Establishing a State from 2009; and Homestretch to Freedom from 2010 – also fail to discuss the stifling effect the Paris Protocols have had on Palestinian economy. 

Spanning 35 pages – as opposed to NAFTA’s more than 1,000 pages – this economic agreement reproduces Palestinian subjugation to Israel, while undercutting the very possibility of Palestinian sovereignty. The agreement’s major problem, as Israeli economists Arie Arnon and Jimmy Weinblatt pointed out over a decade ago, is that it establishes a customs union with Israel based on Israeli trade regulations, allows Israel to maintain control of all labour flows, and prohibits the Palestinians from introducing their own currency, thus barring their ability to influence interest rates, inflation, etc.

Why, we need to ask ourselves, does Prime Minister Fayyad wish to “improve” the Paris Protocols, and why doesn’t the World Bank even mention the agreement, needless to say the severe limitations that it imposes on the Palestinian Authority’s ability to choose their own economic regime and adopt trade policies according to their perceived interests?

The answer has to do with a shared and ongoing investment in Oslo.

Prime Minister Fayyad, the World Bank and indeed most western leaders perceive the current economic crisis in the Palestinian territories as resulting from the collapse of the 1993 Oslo process. They would like to bring Oslo back on track, develop and expand it. By contrast, most Palestinian analysts currently maintain that the Oslo agreements are to blame for the collapse of the Palestinian economy.

The protesters know that the West Bank’s fragmentation, the Palestinians’ inability to control their own borders and the lack of access to huge swaths of land (which are highlighted in the reports), are intricately tied to the untenable customs union and the absence of a Palestinian currency. These restrictions are all part and parcel of the Oslo Accords and not an aberration from them.

Hence, it would be rash to think that the Palestinian protesters are blaming Prime Minister Fayyad for the economic crisis, since every West Bank resident knows all too well that the crisis is the result of the occupation. It consequently seems reasonable to assume that they are blaming Fayyad for continuing to play the Oslo game.

Palestinians have no sovereignty in the Occupied Territories, and yet they have a president, a prime minister and an array of ministers who for years now have postured as part of a legitimate government in an independent country. The only way to end the occupation is by forsaking Oslo; to force the Palestinian Authority to stop playing this futile game and to deal head on with its disastrous repercussions.

thanks to: Neve Gordon, the author of Israel’s Occupation that can be reached through his website.
Aljazeera.